Magnetic resonance imaging signs of presumed elevated intracranial pressure in dogs

posted in: Magnetic Moments | 0

Bittermann S, Lang J, Henke D, et al. 

Vet J 2014;201:101-108.

The aim of this study was to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings associated with presumed elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in dogs and to evaluate whether MRI could be used to discriminate between dogs with and without elevated ICP. Of 91 dogs that underwent cranial MRI examination, 18 (19.8%) were diagnosed with elevated ICP based on neurological examination, fundoscopy and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. The MRI findings that showed the strongest association with elevated ICP were mass effect (odds ratio [OR], 78.5), caudal transtentorial herniation (OR, 72.0), subfalcine herniation (OR, 45.6), perilesional oedema (OR, 34.0), displacement of the lamina quadrigemina (OR, 27.7) and effacement of the cerebral sulci (OR, 27.1). The presence of any two or more of the following MRI findings identified elevated ICP with a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 96%: compression of the suprapineal recess, compression of the third ventricle, compression of the fourth ventricle, effacement of the cerebral sulci and caudal transposition of the lamina quadrigemina. In conclusion, there is an association between MRI findings and elevated ICP in dogs; therefore, MRI might be useful to discriminate between dogs with and without elevated ICP.