Computed tomographic morphology and clinical features of extrahepatic portosystemic shunts in 172 dogs in Japan

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Fukushima K, Kanemoto H, Ohno K, et al.

Vet J 2014;199:376-381.

Canine extrahepatic congenital portosystemic shunts (EH-cPSS) are classified into several anatomical types, depending on the origin and termination of the shunt vessel. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the proportion and clinical features of each anatomical shunt type in a population of dogs presented to a veterinary teaching hospital in Japan. Dogs diagnosed with EH-cPSS using computed tomographic (CT) portography were included (n=172) and shunts were classified based on previous reports. Clinical data were collected from case records and analysed statistically. The most common anatomical type was the spleno-phrenic shunt (n=64), followed by the spleno-azygos (n=38), right gastric-caval (n=29), spleno-caval (n=21), right gastric-caval with caudal loop (n=9), right gastric-phrenic (n=6), colono-caval (n=3), spleno-phrenic and azygos (n=1), and porto-caval (n=1) shunts. Spleno-phrenic and spleno-azygos shunts were diagnosed more frequently in older dogs than right gastric-caval and spleno-caval shunts (P<0.05). The portal vein/aortic (PV/Ao) ratio was significantly larger in dogs with spleno-phrenic shunts than in dogs with spleno-azygos, right gastric-caval or spleno-caval shunts (P<0.05). The PV/Ao ratio was significantly larger in dogs with spleno-azygos shunts than in dogs with right gastric-caval shunts. Dogs with spleno-phrenic shunts had significantly lower serum alkaline phosphatase activities than those with right gastric-caval or spleno-caval shunts. Dogs with spleno-phrenic shunts had significantly lower fasting ammonia concentrations than those with spleno-caval shunts.