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2000/09
Dynamic CT Measurement of Contrast Medium Washin Kinetics in Canine Nasal Tumors

Van Camp S., Fisher P. and Thrall D.E.

Vet Radiol Ultrasound, 2000. 41(5): p.403-8.

Tumor oxygenation affects the biologic behavior of a tumor and also its radiation response. Decreased tumor oxygenation has been associated with an aggressive phenotype and with decreased local tumor control following irradiation. Thus, measurement of oxygenation may be useful for pretreatment evaluation of a tumor. Many methods for assessing tumor oxygenation are available but most are invasive. There is a need for a non-invasive measure of oxygenation, or a surrogate for oxygenation. Measurement of perfusion has been suggested as a substitute for measurement of oxygenation. The use of washin kinetics of iodinated contrast medium to estimate perfusion has been shown to be related to radiation response of human carcinomas. We quantified the washin kinetics of iodinated contrast medium using dynamic CT in 9 dogs. All dogs had a malignant nasal tumor and perfusion was quantified at two sites in each tumor to evaluate intratumoral variation in perfusion. Dogs were given an intravenous bolus injection of contrast medium and arterial and tumor washin kinetics quantified using a helical CT scanner. Perfusion was estimated from these data using previously validated methods. Eight of the 9 dogs received definitive radiation therapy and perfusion was quantified a second time in these 8 dogs midway through irradiation. Pretreatment perfusion varied between dogs by a factor of 16.9. Between dog variation in perfusion was subjectively greater than within tumor variation based on comparison of two intratumoral regions. Changes in perfusion in individual dogs during irradiation were observed, but no identifiable pattern of perfusion alteration was detected. Measurement of perfusion in canine nasal tumors using dynamic CT is possible and further study of this parameter as it relates to radiation response is reasonable.